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Showing posts with label Antarctica. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Antarctica. Show all posts

Antarctica's Tallest Volcano - Mount Sidley

Antarctica’s Tallest Volcano
acquired November 20, 2014

Antarctica’s Tallest Volcano
acquired November 20, 2014 download large image (3 MB, JPEG, 7500x7500)
acquired November 20, 2014 download GeoTIFF file (48 MB, TIFF, 9000x9000)
acquired November 20, 2014 download Google Earth file (KML)
                           

Along a 900-kilometer (560-mile) stretch of Antarctica's Pacific Coast, 18 major volcanoes jut from the ice sheet. The chain, similar in size to the Cascade volcanic chain in North America, is home to the continent’s tallest volcano—Mount Sidley. (Not to be confused with Vinson Massif, Antarctica's tallest mountain.)

These images of Mount Sidley were acquired on November 20, 2014, by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8. The volcano stands about 4,200 meters (13,800 feet) above sea level and 2,200 meters (7,200 feet) above ice level. The caldera wall, which is mostly shadowed in this image, is about 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) high. The caldera floor spans 5 kilometers (3 miles).

According to the USGS Geographic Names Information System, Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd discovered the volcano during a flight on November 18, 1934. He later named the mountain after Mabelle E. Sidley, the daughter of a contributor to the Byrd Antarctic Expedition.

Sidley is one of five volcanoes in the Executive Committee Range (top image), which stretches about 80 kilometers (50 miles) from north to south. The range was discovered during a flight by the United States Antarctic Service on December 15, 1940, and it is named for the Service’s Executive Committee. Mount Sidley is the only mountain in the range not named for a committee member.

Mount Sidley is the youngest volcano in the Executive Committee Range to rise above the ice sheet. Below the ice sheet, however, seismologists have detected new volcanic activity 30 miles from Sidley, according to a 2013 news report .





NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Kathryn Hansen.
                              
Instrument(s): 
Landsat 8 - OLI
NASA





Watch the Northern Lights in Stunning 4K High Resolution Video

Come along with us on a virtual experience, Aurora Chasing in 4K Ultra High Def!

Despite being under the weather (in all senses, it was well below zero and we were quite sick with the flu), Marketa, Angus and I ventured out to capture the Northern Lights with our newest tool, the Atomos Shogun 4K external recorder. We combined this with a Sony a7S and a DJI Ronin for a look at what's it like to "Chase the Lights."




The Atomos did great and while the Ronin usually does a good job it seemed quite jittery on this night. I'm in contact with support and hope to find a resolution to this but it's done that the last few times I've taken it out in temps colder than 10ºF. Keep in mind it is very windy, I'm stumbling around in knee deep snow and it's about 0ºF so considering, it still held up rather well. This is a sample of how the Ronin should and usually does behave. http://youtu.be/1bb5qGmtG_M As of 1/14/15 I'm still waiting to hear back from DJI.

It seems we have a few things to work out both with the Ronin and the Shogun but are very excited for this amazing trio once we get things rolling smoothly.

If you'd like to be out there having your portraits taken in front of these magnificent Northern Lights, join us for a night under the Aurora. http://www.ronnmurrayphoto.com/Northe... This video intended to show what's its like to actually be out beneath these amazing Auroras we witness almost nightly. Please explore this channel, and our website for the more polished videos.





Gear list
Sony a7S
Rokinon 24mm f/1.4
DJI Ronin Gimbal Stabilizer
Atomos Shogun 4K Monitor and Recorder

Video filmed in the Murphy Dome area near Fairbanks, Alaska on Friday night, January 2nd in the late night and early morning hours.

Music Licensed at MusicBed.com
Song: "A Closing Statement" by Dexter Britain


Slideshow - Climate Change is Real - The Inconvenient Truth

In 2009, Al Gore followed up with the publication of Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis, a book that "gathers in one place all of the most effective solutions that are available now and that, together, will solve this crisis". "It is now abundantly clear that we have at our fingertips all of the tools we need to solve the climate crisis. The only missing ingredient is collective will."








One thousand years of temperature history obtained from isotope analysis of ice cores.


Measured since 1958, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been increasing steadily.






One thousand years of CO2 and temperature data -- the curves have similar shape.







650,000 years of CO2 and temperature history, from Antarctic ice cores. Dips record ice ages. CO2 concentration and temperature are related. CO2 has spiked upward in recent years.







If no changes are made, CO2 concentration is predicted to climb much higher (to 600 ppm) in 45 years.







Ocean temperatures since 1940. Blue indicates normal range, green indicates range predicted by climate models due to human causes.







Ocean temperatures (see previous chart). Red line indicates actual ocean temperature history (outside and above normal range -- climate models were right).







As ocean temperatures rise, storms intensify, causing increased insurance pay-outs.







Incidents of major flooding have increased in recent decades.







37 inches (94 cm) of rain in 24 hours flooded Mumbai, India in July 2005.






Global precipitation has increased in last century by 20% but not evenly; some areas have received less. Sub-Sahara Africa is severely affected.







Arctic sea ice extent and thickness has diminished precipitously since the 1970's.







The 'Global Ocean Conveyor Belt' carries heat around the globe, in particular, to Europe. However, disruption due to ice melt has stopped heat flow to Europe in the past.











Global warming shifts the seasons, disrupting ecological relationships. The time of Black Tern bird arrival (blue) and bird hatching (yellow); hatching no longer coincides with insect peak (orange), starving chicks in the Netherlands.







Antarctic ice shelf break-up predicted by models has occurred. Larsen ice shelf (green) broke up from 1995 to 2002. Sea levels are rising. A 20 ft (6m) rise in sea level would create over 100 million refugees.







Population has exploded in the last 200 years. In 1945 there were 2.3 billion people, in 2006 there are 6.5 billion, and in 2050 there may be 9.1 billion.



Much of the population growth is occurring in developing countries.



Population growth and rising living standards drive demand for food.



... and demand for water.



Lights from fishing fleets (blue), fires (red), gas flares (yellow), and cities (white).



Relative contribution to global warming, by country. "USA is responsible for more greenhouse gas pollution than South America, Africa, the Middle East, Australia, Japan, and Asia -- all put together."



Carbon emissions per person, for selected countries.



Carbon emissions per country, for selected countries.







"We don't have to choose between a healthy economy and a healthy environment. Without a planet, we won't enjoy gold bars, and if we do the right things, we'll have both."



Comparison of vehicle fuel economy and emission standards around the world.



California proposes standards that exceed US national standards. US car manufacturers suing California, saying targets are unreachable in 10 years -- despite manufacturers in other countries already doing it now.



Companies building more efficient cars are doing well; US car manufacturers are losing market capitalization.



USA can reduce its emissions by 2050 to pre-1970 levels by a combination of approaches...



... more efficient use of electrical energy (blue), more efficient buildings (purple), improved vehicle efficiency (green), more efficient transport network (light green), increased reliance on bio and wind energy (tan), CO2 sequestering (white).



"Future generations may well have occasion to ask themselves, What were our parents thinking? Why didn't they wake up when they had the chance? We have to hear that question, from them, now."


The Inconvenient Truth - www.web.ncf.ca                                @algore