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Showing posts with label Migration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Migration. Show all posts

When You Feed a Cow... Watch the Cow... Ian Mitchell-Innes

By Ian Mitchell-Innes

You feed the bacteria in the Rumen. The health of the Bacteria, will dictate: Performance, Immunity, General health...

Carbon - pH - Protein - Energy - Water - Minerals...










The cow knows where the best Energy is. Sometimes it is in the most unexpected plants. A cow will try and balance her diet, if given the selection.





Grow unwanted plants. Plan for what you want. Use what you have. Planned Grazing, manipulating Time and Stock Density, will grow what you want. Same Paddock, two years later.




Energy is the elusive part of the equation to achieve animal performance... A ruminant knows were the best Energy is.... Use this ability to plan your grazing. Monitor the animal...




All Life needs Energy... Only animals can get the Energy through the soil surface. Action of grazing... Kinetic Energy, action of hooves on the soil surface... Symbiotic Energy, the Energy field around each animal...






There is enough seed already produced. Just create the Environment for the seed that is there, to germinate.



Manage animals with Time. Use the animals ability to select the best Energy. Always manage for animal performance. With out animal performance, you could go broke. As numbers increase, the Stock Density will Increase.

Contact or Book - Ian Mitchell-Innes



One Day Soil... The bigger the herd, the better the animals do and the quicker the soil is restored. The more Carbon (plant material) is trodden onto and into the soil, the better the soil does.

We need to manage the livestock to make sure the soil is covered with growing plants or litter, to keep the soil at a more constant temperature and feed life in the soil.

More Videos by Ian Mitchell-Innes



Mutation and Evolution - How We Are Changing the World Around Us






Fat polar bear swimming in Hudson Bay



Rewilded tiger fitted with a kill switch



Rhinoceros with no horns                                                                      



White House crow








Elephant that has no tusk






Largely, the changes are the result of human intervention, though, like selective breeding, or wildlife protection measures.



Renhui works with the Institute of Critical Zoologists, an organization that brings together artists and scientists to research the relationship between humans and animals.


Fast Company Design                                                Robert Zhao Renhui





Spectacular Drone Video Footage - Maasai Mara Wildebeest Migration

Last year, I embarked on an unforgettable 19 000km adventure that will stay with me for a very long time. I crossed the African continent alone on a motorcycle. The journey took about 6 months, as I took my time to learn more about the 15 African countries I was travelling through .


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I tried to help where I could, particularly with charities for children and wildlife conservation. I also captured many images, many of which are on the Facebook page of Two Wheels Across and documented the entire journey in videos for my Youtube channel.






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One of the exciting parts of my adventure was Casper the friendly drone, a Quadcopter that I used as often as I could to capture the beauty of Africa from the air.


quadcopter


I am excited to share one of the videos I filmed with you. I was fortunate to be in Kenya’s Maasai Mara during the migration and I captured the river crossing from the air. I also danced with an elephant, ran with wildebeests and kept three lions company for a few minutes. I hope you will enjoy the film!




 Guest Blogger in Animal Encounters                             Africa Geographic

The Wildebeest Migration - Timelapse







The time-lapse conveys the magnitude of the migration. This footage was shot over five days in northern Serengeti, Tanzania. It shows the migrating wildebeest crossing the Mara River while moving south into Tanzania from Kenya.The Serengeti Ecosystem supports 1.5 million wildebeest. These wildebeest are forced to migrate around a 40 000 square kilometre area in order to find fresh grazing pastures. The migration is full of danger and hardship for these resilient creatures. Thirst, hunger, exhaustion, predation and the Mara River are just some of the challenges they must face. You can read more about Will’s wildebeest migration project in his free ebook: My Top Ten Wildlife Experiences. -


Posted by News Desk in Animal Encounters, News, Photography, Videos and the News Desk post series.  October 27, 2014




See more at: Africa Geographic