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Showing posts with label Videos. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Videos. Show all posts

Lions Rock Bigcat Sanctuary - Bethlehem - South Africa

On Safari at Lions Rock Bigcat Sanctuary located in Bethlehem, Free State Province, South Africa...

The location is Really Stunning... As part of FOUR PAWS’ work for wild animals in captivity, we focus on the situation of big cats in zoos, in private captivity and in the entertainment industry. The area was was taken over by FOUR PAWS in 2006. During the early days at the newly acquired big cat sanctuary, huge demands were placed on the local team. Massive structural changes had to be made to the area to bring up to FOUR PAWS´ rigorous quality standards










LIONSROCK is also home to a variety of game - Wildebeests Blesbuck, Burchell’s Zebra, Duiker, Eland, Impala, Letchwe, Mountain Reedbuck, Red Hartebeest, Reedbuck, Springbuck, Steenbuck and Waterbuck. There is also a wide variety of bird species that have found refuge on the farm.



Other Big Cats include Tigers... All cats have been rescued ... Four Paws...






Zaheer Bux - Youtube
Zaheer Bux - Twitter




Climate Change and Global Warming


3. Are sea levels rising?





Increases in sea level have tracked strongly with human activity. We started burning fossil fuel during the Industrial Revolution (1760-1850), and our use of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased every year. Sea levels, in response to steadily warming temperatures, also rose steadily.





Unfortunately, the sea level projections don't look like a straight line. It looks like an upward sloping curve. Sea levels aren't increasing at the same rate every year — thatrate is increasing.
At present, sea levels are projected to rise by as much as 3 feet by 2100.





With the planet's ice reserves falling into the oceans faster than humanity has ever seen,the excess water has to go somewhere. 1.6 million people live in the islands scattered across the Pacific (3 million, if you count Hawaii), and they are all in danger of slowly losing their homelands.


But rising sea levels won't just affect faceless people of nations you've never heard of that you don't pronounce correctly (like Kiribati).
Ever heard that saying "A rising tide lifts all boats"? Let's revise that: "A rising tide sinks all coastal communities."
Nearly 40% of Americans live in a coastal county.


Rising sea levels could make significant portions of New York City unlivable.


4. Have recent heat waves been more intense?



How Real is Climate Change and Global Warming

 

The Future of Earth - Global Warming




Video - The Future of Earth with Global Warming

Abbreviated version of the visualization 'Heating Up,' which depicts climate model projection of 21st century global temperatures. Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio.


“Do we think about the aerosol propellant in our underarm deodorant every day?” Gavin Schmidt, climatologist and director of The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), asked me. “I don’t think we even have aerosols anymore,” I answered, wondering where he was going with this.

“That’s the point,” he continued, “and nobody cares. Nobody cares where your energy comes from; nobody cares whether your car is electric or petrol. People confuse energy supply with where the energy is supplied from.” He was trying to make the point that as long as people have the things they want, it doesn’t matter, to the vast majority of us, how we get them. This means that as long as the light switch still turns on the lights, most people would barely notice if we were to shift from burning fossil fuels to energy sources with less impact on Earth’s climate (just as people don’t notice that ozone-depleting propellants aren’t used in aerosol cans any more).

I was eager to speak with Dr. Schmidt because of his passion for communicating climate science to public audiences on top of his work as a climatologist. Schmidt is a co-founder and active blogger at Real Climate and was also awarded the inaugural Climate Communications Prize, by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in 2011. “My goal in communicating,” he explained, “is a totally futile effort to raise the level of the conversation so that we actually discuss the things that matter.”

Since the mere mention of a computer model can cause an otherwise normal person’s face to glaze over, I thought Schmidt, a leader in climate simulations and Earth system modeling, would be the ideal candidate to explain one of the most important, yet probably one of the most misunderstood, instruments scientists have for studying Earth’s climate. See, people commonly confuse climate and weather, and this confusion is perhaps most pronounced when it comes to understanding the difference between a weather forecast and a climate simulation.
Numerical laboratory

Schmidt’s work routine is much like that of any other scientist. He spends a few months preparing experiments, then a few more months conducting the experiments, then a few more months refining and improving the experiments, then a few more months going back and looking at fine details, then a few more months … you get the idea. Climate scientists use complex computer simulations as numerical laboratories to conduct experiments because we don’t have a bunch of spare Earths just lying around. These simulations model Earth’s conditions as precisely as possible. “A single run can take three months on up on super computers,” Schmidt said. “For really long runs, it can take a year.” NASA scientists can reserve time at the NASA Supercomputer Center with High-End Computing Capability to run simulations. Like an astronomer who reserves time on a large telescope to run her experiments, Schmidt books time on these computers to run his.

Schmidt asks the computer to calculate the weather in 20-minute time steps and see how it changes. Every 20 minutes it updates its calculation over hundred-year or even thousand-year periods in the past or the future. “The models that we run process about three to four years of simulation, going through every 20 minute time step, every real day.”

A typical climate simulation code is large, as in 700,000 lines of computer code large. For comparison, the Curiosity Rover required about 500,000 lines of code to autonomously descend safely on Mars, a planet 140 million miles away with a signal time delay of about 14 minutes. The size of a typical app, such as our Earth Now mobile app, is just over 6,000 lines of code. Climate simulations require such a large quantity of code because Earth’s climate is so extraordinarily complex. And, according to Schmidt, “Complexity is quite complex.”

Like a scientist who runs an experiment in a science lab, climate modelers want code that’s consistent from one experiment to another. So they spend most of their time developing that code, looking at code, improving code and fixing bugs.

The model output is compared to data and observations from the real world to build in credibility. “We rate the predictions on whether or not they’re skillful; on whether we can demonstrate they are robust.” When models are tested against the real world, we get a measure of how skillful the model is at reproducing things that have already happened. Then we can be more confident about the accuracy in predicting what’s going to happen. Schmidt wants to find out where the models have skill and where they provide useful information. For example, they’re not very useful for tornado statistics, but they're extremely useful on global mean temperature. According to Schmidt, the credible and consistently reliable predictions include ones that involve adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. “You consistently get increases in temperature and those increases are almost always greater over land than they are in the ocean. They’re always larger in the Arctic than in the mid-latitudes and always more in the northern hemisphere than the southern, particularly Antarctica. Those are very, very robust results.”

Lately, his team has been working on improving the code for sea ice dynamics to include the effects of brine pockets (very salty fluid within the ice matrix) as well as the wind moving the ice around. For example, to understand the timeline for Arctic sea ice loss, his team has to work on the different bits of code for the wind, the temperature, the ocean and the water vapor and include the way all these pieces intersect in the real world. After you improve the code, you can see the impact of those improvements.

I asked Schmidt what people’s behavior would look like “if they understood that burning fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide, which causes global warming.” He replied, “People would start focusing on policies and processes that would reduce the amount of fossil fuels without ruining the economy or wrecking society.” Then he added, “I think, I hope! that people will get it before it’s too late.”

I hope so, too...


Gavin Schmidt

Communications Specialist                                           NASA Climate - Earth Right Now
Laura Faye Tenenbaum is a science communicator at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and teaches oceanography at Glendale Community College.           Contact Laura


How Much Saharan Dust Feeds Amazon’s Plants

What connects Earth's largest, hottest desert to its largest tropical rain forest?

The Sahara Desert is a near-uninterrupted brown band of sand and scrub across the northern third of Africa. The Amazon rain forest is a dense green mass of humid jungle that covers northeast South America. But after strong winds sweep across the Sahara, a tan cloud rises in the air, stretches between the continents, and ties together the desert and the jungle. It’s dust. And lots of it.

For the first time, a NASA satellite has quantified in three dimensions how much dust makes this trans-Atlantic journey. Scientists have not only measured the volume of dust, they have also calculated how much phosphorus – remnant in Saharan sands from part of the desert’s past as a lake bed – gets carried across the ocean from one of the planet’s most desolate places to one of its most fertile.



For the first time, a NASA satellite has quantified in three dimensions how much dust makes the trans-Atlantic journey from the Sahara Desert the Amazon rain forest. Among this dust is phosphorus, an essential nutrient that acts like a fertilizer, which the Amazon depends on in order to flourish.

Image Credit: 
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Watch the Northern Lights in Stunning 4K High Resolution Video

Come along with us on a virtual experience, Aurora Chasing in 4K Ultra High Def!

Despite being under the weather (in all senses, it was well below zero and we were quite sick with the flu), Marketa, Angus and I ventured out to capture the Northern Lights with our newest tool, the Atomos Shogun 4K external recorder. We combined this with a Sony a7S and a DJI Ronin for a look at what's it like to "Chase the Lights."




The Atomos did great and while the Ronin usually does a good job it seemed quite jittery on this night. I'm in contact with support and hope to find a resolution to this but it's done that the last few times I've taken it out in temps colder than 10ºF. Keep in mind it is very windy, I'm stumbling around in knee deep snow and it's about 0ºF so considering, it still held up rather well. This is a sample of how the Ronin should and usually does behave. http://youtu.be/1bb5qGmtG_M As of 1/14/15 I'm still waiting to hear back from DJI.

It seems we have a few things to work out both with the Ronin and the Shogun but are very excited for this amazing trio once we get things rolling smoothly.

If you'd like to be out there having your portraits taken in front of these magnificent Northern Lights, join us for a night under the Aurora. http://www.ronnmurrayphoto.com/Northe... This video intended to show what's its like to actually be out beneath these amazing Auroras we witness almost nightly. Please explore this channel, and our website for the more polished videos.





Gear list
Sony a7S
Rokinon 24mm f/1.4
DJI Ronin Gimbal Stabilizer
Atomos Shogun 4K Monitor and Recorder

Video filmed in the Murphy Dome area near Fairbanks, Alaska on Friday night, January 2nd in the late night and early morning hours.

Music Licensed at MusicBed.com
Song: "A Closing Statement" by Dexter Britain


Spectacular Drone Video Footage - Maasai Mara Wildebeest Migration

Last year, I embarked on an unforgettable 19 000km adventure that will stay with me for a very long time. I crossed the African continent alone on a motorcycle. The journey took about 6 months, as I took my time to learn more about the 15 African countries I was travelling through .


_MG_4581_S


I tried to help where I could, particularly with charities for children and wildlife conservation. I also captured many images, many of which are on the Facebook page of Two Wheels Across and documented the entire journey in videos for my Youtube channel.






_MG_4421_S


One of the exciting parts of my adventure was Casper the friendly drone, a Quadcopter that I used as often as I could to capture the beauty of Africa from the air.


quadcopter


I am excited to share one of the videos I filmed with you. I was fortunate to be in Kenya’s Maasai Mara during the migration and I captured the river crossing from the air. I also danced with an elephant, ran with wildebeests and kept three lions company for a few minutes. I hope you will enjoy the film!




 Guest Blogger in Animal Encounters                             Africa Geographic

Gold Exploration - Central Rand Goldfield - Johannesburg

JOHANNESBURG'S gold mining industry was established when a large gold reef was accidentally discovered on a remote farm in 1886, triggering a massive gold rush by thousands of speculators.
Within 10 years, there was a fully fledged town on the same spot; within 30 years it was South Africa's largest city. Today Johannesburg is Africa's biggest city, ringed by the deepest gold mines in the world.





The City of Johannesburg is littered with Defunct shafts, Old Mine Workings and Mine Waste Dumps... all a history to the name Egoli - The City of Gold... The Powerhouse of #Africa...
The two towers...
The Central Rand Goldfield
Consolidated Main Reef - Diamond Drilling - Bird Reef
Diamond Drilling - Consolidated Main Reef - Kimberley Reef
Crown Mines



RC Drilling - Crown Mines











The Wildebeest Migration - Timelapse







The time-lapse conveys the magnitude of the migration. This footage was shot over five days in northern Serengeti, Tanzania. It shows the migrating wildebeest crossing the Mara River while moving south into Tanzania from Kenya.The Serengeti Ecosystem supports 1.5 million wildebeest. These wildebeest are forced to migrate around a 40 000 square kilometre area in order to find fresh grazing pastures. The migration is full of danger and hardship for these resilient creatures. Thirst, hunger, exhaustion, predation and the Mara River are just some of the challenges they must face. You can read more about Will’s wildebeest migration project in his free ebook: My Top Ten Wildlife Experiences. -


Posted by News Desk in Animal Encounters, News, Photography, Videos and the News Desk post series.  October 27, 2014




See more at: Africa Geographic